What is Nebbiolo Wine? | Nebbiolo Wine Styles and Regions | Barolo, Barbaresco & Langhe Nebbiolo

What is Nebbiolo? What are some noteworthy wine styles produced with this grape and in what regions?

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Discover Nebbiolo Wine

Nebbiolo is a thin-skinned red grape, mostly known for, but not limited to its production in Piedmont, which is in Northwestern Italy. Its name is derived from the Italian word for fog, Nebbia. Generally speaking, Nebbiolo is known for its high tannin, high acidity and its aromas of red cherries, tar and rose pedals. Like all grapes, terroir is one of the largest factors when it comes to expression of the grape along with the producer’s production style. These two elements are what make and differentiate how the Nebbiolo grape is expressed in the wine.

Nebbiolo and its Relationship to Barolo & Barbaresco

The King and Queen of Nebbiolo are located in the Langhe region in Piedmonte. Both are always 100% Nebbiolo, with the king being Barolo and the queen being Barbaresco. Just like you imagined, Barolo is the powerhouse with more tannin and structure, while Barbaresco is slightly lighter in tannin and more elegant in style.

Within these styles, there are two trains of thought when it comes to production. Some producers like to produce a more traditional style, which involves longer maceration times for more extraction from the skins and aging to take place in large Botti (large Slovenian oak barrels). These wines need much more time in the cellar before they will be ready to drink. The other style comes from the modernist producers. These wines use shorter maceration times and will incorporate the use of Barriques (small French oak barrels). The idea behind these wines is to be ready to drink at a younger age. There is an argument for both styles, and I believe there to be a place in the market for both.

Nebbiolo Vines in the Langhe Region of Piedmont, Italy

Nebbiolo Vines in the Langhe Region of Piedmont, Italy

Langhe Nebbiolo Wines

Also located in the Langhe, you can find a more approachable expression — Langhe Nebbiolo — meaning the grapes can come from anywhere in the Langhe region. These wines are lighter in style with brighter fruit, less tannin and are significantly less expensive. These wines are typically made from the younger Nebbiolo vines.

Heading North…

Moving to the North is an area that’s been gaining popularity over the years — Alto Piemonte. In this area you will find Gattinara, Lessona, Bramaterra, Ghemme, Boca, Fara and Sizzano. All produce wines typically with higher acidity that are very age worthy. These wines are typically blended with Croatina, Vespolina and Uva Rara. Nebbiolo here is known locally as Spanna. Moving even more North and West bordering Valle d’ Aosta you’ll find Carema – a light and dry Nebbiolo wine with high acidity. It’s appellation is very small, but definitely worth checking out.

Valtellina in Lombardy is another wonderful area for the production of Nebbiolo, boasting a rich and aromatic style with a nice structure and elegance. There are other areas in Italy that produce Nebbiolo but I find these to be the most important ones to focus on.

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Jared Gelband
Jared Gelband
Wine and Beverage Director at Italian Village Restaurants
An expert in all things wine and cocktails, Jared Gelband is the Wine and Beverage Director for Italian Village Restaurants, overseeing the award-winning wine cellar with over 20,000 bottles. Working as a server at Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steakhouse, Jared quickly discovered his passion for wine and went on pursue his Level 1 Certification with the Court Of Master Sommeliers. He spent nearly two years as a Sommelier at Eno Wine Bar before joining Italian Village Restaurants in 2016.

In addition to handling wine purchases for all three restaurants, creating crafting new cocktails, and teaching weekly wine classes for employees, Jared also focuses on developing specials and programs including a newly launched Coravin program, summer Rosé program, and more. At Italian Village, his philosophy revolves around variety, integrity and staying ahead of current trends across the U.S. and Italy. When he’s not drinking or working with wine, Jared enjoys snowboarding, golfing, traveling and exploring Chicago’s culinary scene – all while studying for his Level 2 Certification.
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https://italianvillage-chicago.com/

An expert in all things wine and cocktails, Jared Gelband is the Wine and Beverage Director for Italian Village Restaurants, overseeing the award-winning wine cellar with over 20,000 bottles. Working as a server at Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steakhouse, Jared quickly discovered his passion for wine and went on pursue his Level 1 Certification with the Court Of Master Sommeliers. He spent nearly two years as a Sommelier at Eno Wine Bar before joining Italian Village Restaurants in 2016. In addition to handling wine purchases for all three restaurants, creating crafting new cocktails, and teaching weekly wine classes for employees, Jared also focuses on developing specials and programs including a newly launched Coravin program, summer Rosé program, and more. At Italian Village, his philosophy revolves around variety, integrity and staying ahead of current trends across the U.S. and Italy. When he’s not drinking or working with wine, Jared enjoys snowboarding, golfing, traveling and exploring Chicago’s culinary scene – all while studying for his Level 2 Certification.


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